Does a Fidget Spinner Actually Help a Student Concentrate and Focus?

Fidget spinners can be found in every store, classroom and trashcan from Long Beach to Long Island. Kids adore them, babies giggle madly and even grownups can be captivated by their curious movements. Some are even capable of lighting up, levitating and driving classroom teachers bonkers. The fidget spinner has joined the ranks of Rubix cubes, slap bracelets and “my pet rock” in being basically useless and cheap to mass produce.

Selling at anywhere from $2.00 to $200.00 it is obvious someone is becoming very wealthy off the fidget spinner. Then there’s the fantasy of making a kid focus on bookwork by putting something bright shiny and engaging in their hands.

Some schools are getting wise to the marketing ploy and Massachusetts, Florida and New York schools have issued many bans against bringing these dervish-machines into a place of learned scholars. So are these fidget spinners actually beneficial or have we all been bamboozled?

The things is there is some truth to the idea that small manual actions can ground the mind, allow the user to exercise control over their breathing patterns and hence their focus as well as aid in mindfulness exercises. There is no “clinical” evidence that supports or refutes the claims from marketers that fidget spinners aid in focus.

Julie Schweitzer is an authority on behavioral science at the University of California. According to Dr. Schweitzer, the fidget spinner is captivating and engaging whereas a stress ball or chewing gum is a subtle action that vanishes into the subconscious. This captivating aspect keeps the fidget spinner from being a benefit to the student trying to complete a task.

One thing for sure a classroom of students sporting their own brand of fidget spinners, an array of tricks they have perfected in the last few classes and a teacher on their last nerve is no recipe for mental stimulation and education.